Sample Conceptual Framework In Dissertation

The theoretical framework is one of the more infamous components of a dissertation. A good theoretical framework gives you a strong scientific research base and provides support for the rest of your dissertation. But what exactly is a theoretical framework? And how do you write one?

The goal of a theoretical framework

After you have identified your problem statement and research question(s), it is important to determine what theories and ideas exist in relation to your chosen subject.

By presenting this information, you ‘frame’ your research and show that you are knowledgeable about the key concepts, theories, and models that relate to your topic.

The definitions and models you select also give your research direction, as you will continue to build on these choices in different stages of your project.

The theoretical framework also provides scientific justification for your investigation: it shows that your research is not just coming “out of the blue,” but that it is both grounded in and based on scientific theory.

How to determine the contents of a theoretical framework

As noted above, it is important that you cite existing theories and ideas that are relevant to your chosen topic within the theoretical framework. This includes defining key terms from your problem statement and research questions/hypotheses. An important first step is therefore to identify these concepts.

1. Select key concepts

Sample problem statement and research questions: Company X is struggling with the problem that many online customers do not return to make subsequent purchases. Management wants to increase customer loyalty and believes that improved customer satisfaction will play a major role in achieving this goal. To investigate this problem, you have identified and plan to focus on the following problem statement, objective, and research questions:

Problem: Many online customers do not return to make subsequent purchases.

Objective: To increase customer loyalty and thereby generate more revenue.

Research question: ‘How can the satisfaction of company X’s online customers be improved in order to increase customer loyalty?’

Sub-questions:

  1. ‘What is the relationship between customer loyalty and costumer satisfaction?’
  2. ‘How satisfied and loyal are company X’s online costumers currently?’
  3. ‘What factors affect the satisfaction and loyalty of company X’s online costumers?’

The concepts of “customer loyalty” and “customer satisfaction” are critical to this study and will be measured as part of the research. As such they are key concepts to define within the theoretical framework.

2. Define and evaluate relevant concepts, theories, and models

A literature review is first used to determine how other researchers have defined these key concepts. You should then critically compare the definitions that different authors have proposed. The last step is to choose the definition that best fits your research and justify why this is the case.

It is also important to indicate if there are any notable links between these concepts.

Apart from that, you should describe any relevant theories and models that relate to your key concepts and argue why you are or are not applying them to your own research.

3. Consider adding other elements to your theoretical framework

Depending on your topic or discipline, a comprehensive review of the state of affairs in relation to your research topic may also be helpful to include in your theoretical framework.

Here it’s important to understand the expectations of your supervisor or program in advance. Theoretical problems are more likely to require a “state of affairs” overview than more practical problems.

Analyzing the research field will give you an idea of what similar studies have looked at and found regarding the problem. This will clarify the position of your research in relation to existing knowledge in the field.

Following these steps will help to ensure that you are presenting a solid overview:

  • Describe what discussions on the subject exist within the literature.
  • Explain what methods, theories, and models other authors have applied. In doing so, always argue why a particular theory or model is or is not appropriate for your own research.
  • Analyze the similarities and differences between your own research and earlier studies.
  • Explain how your study adds to knowledge that already exists on the subject.

What kinds of research questions can you answer within a theoretical framework?

The theoretical framework can be used to answer descriptive research questions that only require literature (or desk) research. For example, theory alone is sufficient to answer the research question: ‘What is the relationship between customer loyalty and customer satisfaction?’.

In contrast, sub-questions such as ‘How satisfied are company X’s online customers currently?’ cannot be answered in the theoretical framework, given that field research is needed.

The theoretical framework (and the literature review that serves as its backbone) can also be used to further analyze existing findings and hypotheses. It may also be used to formulate and evaluate hypotheses of your own, which you can later test during the qualitative or quantitative research of your study.

The structure of the theoretical framework

There are no fixed rules for structuring a theoretical framework. The important thing is to create a structure that is logical. One way to do this is to draw on your research questions/hypotheses and some of your key terms.

For example, you could create a section or paragraph that looks at each question, hypothesis, or key concept. Within that text, you could then explore the theories and models that are relevant to that particular item.

How long should the theoretical framework be?

The rules about length are not clear either, but a theoretical framework is on average three to five pages long.

To makes things clearer, you might find it useful to include models or other graphics within the theoretical framework. However, if you are concerned about space, you can place these illustrations in an appendix (which you can then refer to in the main text).

Sample theoretical framework

We have prepared a sample theoretical framework that will give you a sense of what this important part of a dissertation may look like.

Sample theoretical framework

Before studying the application of conceptual framework, we need to first define it. It can be defined as a ‘visual’ presentation of key variables, factors or concepts and their relationship among each other which have been or have to be studied in the research either graphically or in some other narrative form (Miles and Huberman, 1994).

How to define conceptual framework

Conceptual Framework is like pre-planning wherein we define what the research will include. However, the position of conceptual framework within Qualitative and Quantitative Research varies. The table below explains the difference in position.

In case of quantitative research, the researcher defines the research problem and key variables which will be used to resolve the problem. However, in case of qualitative research inductive position is applicable wherein the researcher seeks to build up theory. In such a situation, existing theories can be misleading and therefore the conceptual framework emerges after the research is complete.

However, here I should point out that researchers generally have an idea of what will feature in the study which could be treated as a tentative framework which would give an idea, however can be changed over the period of time.

How to develop conceptual framework?

There are several inputs which are essential when working on a conceptual framework. The two main elements are;

  1. Experiential Knowledge: technical knowledge, research background and personal experience.
  2. Literature Review: related theory, related research and other theories and research related to the topic.

The key steps for development of conceptual framework are:

  1. Identify the key variables used in the subject area of your study.
  2. Draw out key variables within something you have already written about the subject area i.e. literature review.
  3. Take one key variable and then brainstorm all the possible things related to the key variable.
  4. After all the variables have been defined, focus on number of relationships they can form with each other to determine the inter-relationships between all.

It can be presented in the form of; flow diagrams, tree diagrams, mind maps or even shape based diagrams. Below are some examples  for better understanding:

Flow chart

Tree diagram

Conceptual framework is essential to bring focus within the content and also acts as a link between literature, methodology and results.

Reference

  • Miles, M. B., & Huberman, M. A. (1994): “Qualitative Data Analysis: An Expanded Sourcebook” (2nd edition). Beverley Hills, Sage.

Shruti Datt

Project Handler at Project Guru

Shruti is B-Tech & M-Tech in Biotechnology. Some of her strengths include, Good interpersonal skills, eye for detail, well devised analytical and decision making skills and a positive attitude towards life. Her aim in life is to obtain a responsible and challenging position where her education and work experience will have valuable application.
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